Adjectives Grammar Index Page

Degrees of Irregular Adjectives

A few common Latin adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative degrees, just as the degrees of "good, better, best" are irregular in English. Notice that, while the forms are irregular, the comparative remains a 3rd declension adjective and the superlative is still a 1st/2nd declension adjective. As with all adjectives in the latter group, the 1st declension is used to modify feminine nouns, while the 2nd declension modifies masculine and neuter nouns.

Positive Comparative Superlative
bonus, -a, -um
good
melior, melius
better
optimus, -a, -um
best
malus
bad
peior, peius
worse
pessimus, -a, um
worst
magnus,-a, -um
great,large
maior, maius
greater
maximus, -a, -um
greatest
parvus, -a, -um
small
minor, minus
smaller
minimus, -a, -um
smallest
multi, -ae, -a
many
plures, plura
more
plurimi, -ae, -a
most

Some adjectives having "missing " parts. This means that we have no written record of them anywhere in the body of Latin that survives (although linguists can guess at what they might have been).

Positive Comparative Superlative
no positive form exterior, exterius
outer
extremus, -a, -um
outermost, farthest
no positive form inferior, inferius
lower
infimus, -a, -um
lowest, bottom of
no positive form prior, prius
former, earlier
primus, -a, -um
first, foremost
no positive form superior, superius
higher
summus, -a, -um
highest
no positive form ulterior, ulterius
farther
ultimus, -a, -um
farthest

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